Archive: our articles

Category: WebAssembly

.NET

Blazor WebAssembly in Practice: Maturity, Success Factors, Showstoppers

ASP.NET Core Blazor is Microsoft’s framework for implementing web-based applications, aimed at developers with knowledge of .NET and C#. It exists alongside other frameworks such as ASP.NET Core MVC. About two and a half years after the release of Blazor WebAssembly and based on our experiences from many customer projects at Thinktecture, we want to have a close look at the following questions: What is the current state of the framework? How can you successfully use Blazor? And where does it have limitations?

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Three different textured walls
.NET

Dependency Injection Scopes in Blazor

The dependency injection system is a big part of how modern ASP.NET Core works internally: It provides a flexible solution for developers to structure their projects, decouple their dependencies, and control the lifetimes of the components within an application. In Blazor – a new part of ASP.NET Core – however, the DI system feels a bit odd, and things seem to work a bit differently than expected. This article will explain why this is not only a feeling but indeed the case in the first place and how to handle the differences in order to not run into problems later on.

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ASP.NET Core

Blazor WebAssembly – Unleash The Power Of Dynamic Template-Based UIs With Razor Engine

In general, you can divide template engines into two types. The relatively simple ones are using template strings with placeholders to be replaced by some concrete values. The other template engines can do everything the simple ones can but additionally provide means for control of the code flow, like if-else statements, loops, and further. In this article, I will focus on the latter by using the Razor engine inside a Blazor WebAssembly application.

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.NET CORE

WebAssembly Beyond The Browser: Running WASM In .NET Core Applications With WASI & Wasmtime

When people talk about WebAssembly and .NET Core these days, they immediately think about Blazor WebAssembly. But there is more to it. Actually, Blazor WebAssembly currently does not run our code as a WebAssembly (WASM) module, but rather runs the .NET CLR (or a Mono version of it) as a WASM module and our .NET code is run as plain old .NET assemblies on top of it. But there is indeed the need for executing (native) code as WebAssembly modules in the browser, and in .NET Core applications as well. In this article, I show how you can achieve running WASM code in .NET Core, with a most likely future-proof approach.

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ASP.NET Core

Blazor WebAssembly – Changing The Log Level At Runtime

With Blazor WebAssembly we are now able to create single-page applications (SPA) using C# and the ASP.NET Core Framework. When coming from ASP.NET Core MVC, you may ask yourself what .NET features are available, limited, or not available when running in the browser. One of them is logging, which is a basic means for debugging in both production environments and during development.

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Angular

Re-Using Angular components in a Blazor WebAssembly application using Angular Elements – Web Components custom elements, FTW!

Microsoft’s Blazor WebAssembly toolkit is one of the new kids on the block in WebAssembly land. For many developers WebAssembly (or WASM) is the origin for a new revolution in the web. We can finally(?) use other languages and frameworks than JavaScript to run applications in a standards-based way in a cross-platform fashion on all browsers, on any devices (please refer to the current support of WebAssembly in your browser).

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